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Museum of Contemporary Art

Ušće 10, blok 15, Belgrade
Working hours: from 10:00 to 18:00, Thursday from 10:00 to 22:00
The Museum is closed on Tuesdays
Admission fees
Individual visit - 300 rsd
Group visit - 200 rsd
Students, pensioners - 150 rsd
Free admission on Wednesdays/p>

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Salon of the Museum of Contemporary Art

14 Pariska St., Belgrade
Working hours: from 12:00 to 20:00, except Tuesdays
Admission is free of charge

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Gallery-Legacy of Milica Zorić & Rodoljub Čolaković

2 Rodoljuba Čolakovića St, Belgrade
Working hours: from 12:00 to 20:00, except Tuesdays
Admission is free of charge

Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...

Programme | 21.02.2012

Radenko Milak
And what else did you see?
– I couldn’t see everything!


Gallery-Legacy of Milica Zorić & Rodoljub Čolaković, 2 Rodoljub Čolaković St.
February 21 - March 19, 2012.

Curator: Branislav Dimitrijević

What Capa’s photography of a dying Spanish Republican was for the Spanish Civil War, and what the picture of the execution of a Vietcong taken in Saigon in 1968 by Eddie Adams was for the war in Vietnam – one photograph of Ron Haviv from Bijeljina in 1992 became for the media portrayal of the war in Yugoslavia during the nineties. It shows an “Arkan’s soldier” kicking a woman lying on the sidewalk with other helpless civilians. Perhaps there were recordings of the war violence in Bosnia that were more brutal, but this one somehow distinguished itself as especially emblematic and symbolic. In fact, it demonstrates and personifies in a way what could be characterized as the “power of picture” and its media circulation. Besides, exhibition of Haviv’s photographs was violently prevented in 2002 in several Serbian cities, while Arkan himself claimed in an interview that it was a picture of Serbian civilians and Muslim soldiers. Although all the circumstances of the recorded event were described in detail in a public testimony of an “Arkan’s tiger” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeJnUlg_L4U&feature=related), many are still inclined to believe that the photograph is a fake or that the soldier just “awkwardly jumped onto the sidewalk”…

Twenty years after the photographed event, Banja Luka painter Radenko Milak returns to this traumatic scene and begins a series of painted copies of the Haviv’s photograph, making over twenty of them thus far. By giving himself a seemingly absurd artistic task, Milak reexamines both the media spectacularization of war and violence, and his own feeling of disgust towards the photographed event and the expression of commiseration with the victims. Through his “painting exorcism”, Milak transforms the technically reproduced picture into a series of unique manual pictures and in this way transfigures one media scene into the intimate format of “civil painting”. Milak’s painted copies differ from one another since they are a result of manual work and depend on the painter’s current condition, and not only on the “internal” character of the picture itself. Painting is a material, bodily act that involves durability and constant involvement in every detail that can be a matter of coincidence in a photograph. A painting sign does not give information merely on the painted event, but it is always auto-reflexive, and deals with the relationship between some event and the “bodily” experience of this event.

Radenko Milak (Travnik, 1980) studied painting in Belgrade and Banja Luka and is also famous as the founder of the independent artist association Protok and the director of the Spaport Biennial of Contemporary Art in Banja Luka.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with texts from Branislav Dimitrijević, Ivana Lago and Antonia Majača.

The exhibition opened by Ivan Colović, anthropologist, founder and editor of Biblioteka XX vek and author of a number of essays and books, among which are Warriors’ Brothel and The Balkans: Terror of Culture.

In the context of the announced cooperation between the MCA and the museum Ars Aevi in Sarajevo, with this exhibition the Belgrade museum starts working on the preparation of the Sarajevo collection and commences to mark twenty years from the beginning of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Ars Aevi is a project for creation of a regional center and a museum of contemporary world art in Sarajevo. The Ars Aevi collection consists of more than 160 works of renowned artists from all parts of the world, as the result of cooperation between the international network of museums of contemporary art, foundations, centers and galleries in Italy, Slovenia, Austria, Turkey and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...
Radenko Milak: And what else did you see? ...